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Self Tests

Simple Questions About Action Potentials

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your Answer

 

 

 

 

 

 

Correct Answer

1. The action potential (AP) on neuron A will split into four smaller action potentials prior to reaching neuron C.  True
False
2. Even if the neurotransmitters secreted by neuron A are excitatory (EPSPs) - there will NOT be enough EPSPs to produce an action potential on neuron C. (Note: there is only one action potential on neuron A - also, for this question, pretend that neuron B does NOT exist.)  True
False
3. It is possible that neuron A secretes inhibitory neurotransmitters (NTSs) and neurons B secretes excitatory neurotransmitters.  True
False
4.When the action potential on neuron A reaches the axon terminals (butons) and neurotransmitters are released and "hit" neuron C, there will be a change in the Resting Membrane Potential (RMP) of neuron C  True
False
5. There is one action potential on both neuron A and neuron B - IF both neurons secrete neurotransmitters that are inhibitory (IPSPs) and if they reach neuron C at approximately the same time, then an action potential will definitely be formed on neuron C.  True
False
6. IF neuron A secretes dopamine, then we know that neuron C must secrete acetyl choline (ACh).  True
False
7. One "hit" from an inhibitory neurotransmitter will cause a neuron's membrane potential to move farther away from the threshold.  True
False
8. One "hit" from an excitatory neurotransmitter will cause a neuron's membrane potential to move closer to the threshold.  True
False
9. IF neuron A secreted excitatory NTSs, and IF there were 4 APs (as opposed to the one you see in the picture) THEN, an action potential could be formed on neuron C. (Would the RMP move enough to reach the threshold?)  True
False
10. Action potentials are "membrane events."  True
False

 
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