PsTL 1135 Grades Page

WebAnatomy | 1135


Very Important: The most difficult points in PsTL 1135 are on lecture exams, whereas the easiest points are on the quizzes and in lab. Many people are able to pass this class by maximizing their quiz and lab points (for example, scoring about 90% in these two areas), and then “passing” exams (for example, scoring 60 to 70% on exams). I generally tell students that they must score above 60% on the exams in order to pass this class, but that assumes good to very good performance on the quizzes and in the dissection lab.

GRADES %
A 92-100%
A- 90-91%
 B+ 88-89%
B 82-87%
B- 80-81%
C+ 78-79%
C 65-77%
C- 63-64%
D+ 60-62%
D 56-59%
 F 55% and below

GRADES %
A 92-100%
A- 90-91%
 B+ 88-89%
B 82-87%
B- 80-81%
C+ 78-79%
C 65-77%
C- 63-64%
D+ 60-62%
D 56-59%
 F 55% and below
 
S MUST BE ABOVE 65%

 

 

 

 

 

Spring 2013

Mid Semeter Grades .. Estimate!

Look to the r to see how %% relate to letter grades.

Does not include lab grades, homework, or extra credit projects

But does include:

Test 1 and Coop Quizzes

 

At the end of hte course:

- We'll drop the lowest exam score

- We'll drop the lowest quiz scores

- Check your syllabus about the "bump" and possible "double bump."

Questions about the lab should go to Katherine Phelleps or your lab TA.

 

Be sure to keep all your scantrons in case there are errors in the gradebook!

 

 

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IMPORTANT: You must make arrangements to receive an Incomplete; these arrangements must be made prior to the Final Exam. Never just assume that you can get an I in any course – you must talk to the instructor.

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PsTL 1135 Make-Up Policy: If you miss an exam, contact Murray Jensen immediately

Make-Up Exams (Lecture):  Make-up exams, for the multiple-choice exams, will be an essay exam that will be given during the following week’s discussion section.  If there is a quiz scheduled during that time, your score on that quiz will be calculated as a percentage of how well you do on the make-up exam.  (Example: If you score 75% on the make-up quiz, you will be awarded 75% of the points on that day’s quiz.)  No make-ups will be given for WebVista tests, but rather a grade will be calculated as a percentage of your performance on the lecture (multiple choice) exam given that same week.   Questions?  Ask Murray Jensen.

 

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General and Specific Criteria - Physical and Biological Sciences Diversified Core

PsTL 1135 Human Anatomy and Physiology is a freshman level life-science course that is organized around the major organ systems in the context of their roles in maintaining homeostasis. Students first are exposed to the concept of hierarchical organization of the body, then learn how these interrelationships lay the foundation for the study of the body's systems. Relationships between structure (anatomy) and function (physiology) are stressed. Using homeostasis to tie the systems together leads to discussion of both normal and abnormal (pathological) functioning.

Physiology, the study of function, readily lends itself to asking questions, constructing hypotheses, and designing experiments in order to collect data which may confirm or refute the hypotheses; students discover that this is a scientific "way of knowing." Even anatomy, which may seem fairly fixed, is always in a state of flux as new technologies, such as more powerful imaging devices, provide new insight. Understanding the scientific method allows students to achieve a healthy skepticism and provides the tools for evaluating health news and advertising. Students gain the ability to make knowledgeable choices regarding their health, medical care, and lifestyles.

In the weekly 2-hour wet lab, through demonstrations and hands-on activities, some of the methods used by anatomists and physiologists are presented: dissection, use of the microscope, "what will happen if..." experiments, and computer simulations. For example, students will learn how to use the microscope in order to examine different types and subtypes of tissues, and discuss how their differences might be related to function. Simple dissections of sheep hearts allow students to discover the heart's gross anatomy and how it is related to cardiac physiology.  Examples from the history of science will be used to introduce and, in some cases, further illustrate specific issues in anatomy and physiology.

Our students are required to learn basic anatomy, but are encouraged to learn the anatomy in the context of the physiology. Students discover that the unfamiliar Latin- and Greek-based names and terms of biology have meaning, and can be used as a tool that provides information and aids in memorization. Each week, students participate in cooperative group work to complete quizzes and technology enhanced learning projects, such as creating web-based research projects on human diseases.  Additionally, every student must read and write a report on a book outside of class that relates to human anatomy and physiology, e.g., Mapping Fate, When the Air Hits Your Brain, Genome, etc.  Students engage in additional writing assignments in the wet lab where weekly lab summaries are collected and graded.

In a typical semester students meet in a large lecture hall for no less than 28 hours, meet in a computer lab for no less than 15 hours, and engage in lab activities in the wet lab for no less than 28 hours.

 

 

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PSTL 1135, Human Anatomy and Physiology, is a developmental education course intended for college freshmen. The course has three components: First, a traditional lecture where students are expected to take notes and exams, second, a computer lab where students engage in cooperative quizzes and activities such as a "do something cool" project, and third, a laboratory component where students dissect eyes, brains, hearts, etc., and participate in many other hands-on activities. The course is organized around body systems, e.g., the skeletal system, the nervous system, etc., and focus on many common diseases such as diabetes, cancer, and atherosclerosis. All students enrolled in PSTL 1135 will be required to read at least one book, such as "When the Air Hits Your Brain," outside of regular class time. This course makes considerable use of Web Vista and a course internet site. Do not take this course if you do not enjoy using computers or if you do not have access to a fast and reliable internet connection. Please look up the PSTL 1135 website for more details: http://www.msjensen.gen.umn.edu/1135/